• 38 minutes of panic: Here's how people in Hawaii reacted to a false ballistic missile alert

    4 days ago - By Business Insider

    Hawaiians received a false alarm on Saturday warning of an inbound ballistic missile and causing instant, widespread panic.
    The alert was apparently caused by an employee at Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency pushing the wrong button by accident.
    A second alert clarifying that there was no missile threat to Hawaii did not come until 38 minutes after the initial false alarm.
    Residents and vacationers in Hawaii awoke Saturday morning to a stunning emergency alert blaring across the screens of their smartphones: "BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS...
    Read more ...

     

  • The false Hawaii missile alert was caused by an employee pushing the wrong button, governor says

    The false Hawaii missile alert was caused by an employee pushing the wrong button, governor says

    4 days ago - By Business Insider

    A false alarm was broadcast to Hawaii on Saturday warning of an inbound ballistic missile, causing widespread panic.
    Officials quickly confirmed afterward that the alert was a false alarm and had been sent out by mistake.
    Hawaii Gov. David Ige said the alert was caused by an employee pushing the wrong button by accident.
    Hawaii Gov. David Ige said Saturday that a false alarm warning the entire state of an inbound ballistic missile earlier that day occurred because someone accidentally "pressed the wrong button" during an employee shift change.
    "It was a mistake made during a standard...
    Read more ...

     

  • Hawaii lawmakers say false alarm of inbound ballistic missile was 'totally unacceptable'

    Hawaii lawmakers say false alarm of inbound ballistic missile was 'totally unacceptable'

    4 days ago - By Business Insider

    A false alarm was pushed to phones in Hawaii Saturday morning that said a ballistic missile was "inbound."
    It took more than 30 minutes for authorities to correct the mistake and issue a new alert.
    Hawaii Governor David Ige said somebody "pushed the wrong button."
    Panic and confusion in Hawaii lasted more than half an hour Saturday morning, after an alert was pushed to people's phones warning of an incoming "ballistic missile threat."
    The governor said it happened when an employee pushed the wrong button during a shift change. But the false alarm sparked outrage from local politicians, as...
    Read more ...