• Goldman Sachs ex-CEO Lloyd Blankfein said he might struggle to vote for Sanders over Trump, suggested he doesn't see himself as rich, and compared Wall Street bankers to antelope and samurai

    3 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Lloyd Blankfein blasted Sen. Bernie Sanders' planned wealth tax and warned he was as divisive as President Trump in a Financial Times interview .
    "I think I might find it harder to vote for Bernie than for Trump," the former Goldman Sachs CEO said.
    The billionaire said he doesn't see himself as rich, only "well-to-do."
    Blankfein also compared Wall Street bankers to antelope and samurai, arguing they were scapegoats for the 2008 financial crisis.
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    Billionaire and former Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein said he might struggle to vote for...
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  • A simple trading strategy has historically made investors an average of 21% in just 6 days. Here's how Goldman Sachs says you can replicate it

    A simple trading strategy has historically made investors an average of 21% in just 6 days. Here's how Goldman Sachs says you can replicate it

    3 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    A trading strategy of buying call options shortly before Analyst Day events - then selling them shortly after - has averaged a 21% return over the past 18 years, according to derivatives strategists at Goldman Sachs.
    The strategy is already up 28% this year - and Goldman has a list of 20 stocks traders can use to exploit it in the next few weeks.
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  • Goldman Sachs' investment chief for wealth management says there's an 87% chance stocks will rise over the next year - and explains why traders should resist jumping ship

    Goldman Sachs' investment chief for wealth management says there's an 87% chance stocks will rise over the next year - and explains why traders should resist jumping ship

    3 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Sharmin Mossavar-Rahmani, chief investment officer of Goldman Sachs' Private Wealth Management Division, makes a compelling case for the decade-plus bull market in stocks to keep rolling.
    She leans on hard data, historical anecdotes, and low recession probabilities to bolster her thesis.
    Mossavar-Rahmani says "the economic backdrop suggests staying invested."
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