• Investors betting against weed stocks are getting crushed - but they refuse to throw in the towel

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Short sellers, or investors betting against weed stocks, have $1.7 billion on the line as valuations have surged this quarter.
    Investors are paying $1.1 million a day to borrow stocks in order to short them, data from the financial-analytics firm S3 Partners shows.
    Despite the surge in prices, not many of those short sellers are buying shares to cover their bets - a sign of their conviction.
    High-flying marijuana stocks have already cost short sellers more than $900 million this year, but those skeptics don't appear to be giving up anytime soon.
    There's at least $1.7 billion riding against...
    Read more ...

     

  • Investors betting against weed stocks are getting crushed - but they refuse to throw in the towel

    Investors betting against weed stocks are getting crushed - but they refuse to throw in the towel

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Short sellers, or investors betting against weed stocks, have $1.7 billion on the line as valuations have surged this quarter.
    Investors are paying $1.1 million a day to borrow stocks in order to short them, data from the financial-analytics firm S3 Partners shows.
    Despite the surge in prices, not many of those short sellers are buying shares to cover their bets - a sign of their conviction.
    High-flying marijuana stocks have already cost short sellers more than $900 million this year, but those skeptics don't appear to be giving up anytime soon.
    There's at least $1.7 billion riding against...
    Read more ...

     

  • Investors betting against weed stocks are getting crushed - but they refuse to throw in the towel

    Investors betting against weed stocks are getting crushed - but they refuse to throw in the towel

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Short sellers, or investors betting against weed stocks, have $1.7 billion on the line as valuations have surged this quarter.
    Investors are paying $1.1 million a day to borrow stocks in order to short them, data from the financial-analytics firm S3 Partners shows.
    Despite the surge in prices, not many of those short sellers are buying shares to cover their bets - a sign of their conviction.
    High-flying marijuana stocks have already cost short sellers more than $900 million this year, but those skeptics don't appear to be giving up anytime soon.
    There's at least $1.7 billion riding against...
    Read more ...